Books

Books by Author        by Genre


Roy J. Beckemeyer
Stage Whispers (poetry) *2019 Nelson Poetry Book Award



Edna Bell-Pearson
Headwinds (memoir) *2020 Kansas Notable Book


Arlice W. Davenport


How Time Moves: New and Selected Poems (poetry) *NEW November 2020


To Leave a Shadow (a Pete Stone, Private Investigator novel) *2016 Kansas Notable Book, 2016 Looks Like a Million Design Award
Shadow of Death (a Pete Stone, Private Investigator novel)
Green Bike, a group novel (fiction)
All Hallows' Shadows (a Pete Stone, Private Investigator novel)



Mike Hartnett
And I Cried, Too: Confronting Evil in a Small Town (memoir)


Jerilynn Jones Henrikson
A Time for Tears (teen, young adult historical fiction) *NEW November 2020



Duane L. Herrmann
Family Plowing and Other Prairie Poems: new and used (poetry)


Hannah Jeffers-Huser
What Lies Beyond (young adult, fantasy)



James Kenyon
A Cow for College and Other Stories of 1950s Farm Life (memoir) *2018 Martin Kansas History Book Award
Golden Rule Days: History and Recollections of 109 Closed Kansas High Schools (non-fiction) *2019 Martin Kansas History Book Award


Ruth Maus
Valentine (poetry) *2019 Birdy Finalist


Ronda Miller
MoonStain (poetry)
WaterSigns (poetry)



Kevin Rabas
Like Buddha-Calm Bird (poetry)
Songs for My Father (poetry and prose)
Green Bike, a group novel (fiction)


Carol Kapaun Ratchenski
A Certain Kind of Forgiveness (poetry) *2019 Birdy Poetry Prize



Tyler Robert Sheldon
Driving Together (poetry)



Tracy Million Simmons
A Life in Progress and Other Short Stories (fiction)
Green Bike, a group novel (fiction)
Tiger Hunting, a novel (Chasing Tigers Press) *2013 J. Donald Coffin Memorial Book Award



Lisa D. Stewart
The Big Quiet (memoir)



Julie Stielstra
Opulence, Kansas (young adult, fiction)



Olive Sullivan
Wandering Bone (poetry)



Cheryl Unruh
Walking on Water (poetry)



Izzy Wasserstein
When Creation Falls (poetry)


Joann Garrity Williams
Memoirs of the Dysfunctional? (memoir)

4 comments:

  1. Tiger Hunting by Tracy Million Simmons is an incredible story written by a masterful author. The novel grabbed me from its first sentence about a dolphin lying on the side of a highway and wouldn’t release me until the last page.
    Simmons has a literary gift, writing with a strong and clear voice. Her well-developed characters, including a menagerie of animals, somehow fit into a supposedly laid-back Dodge City.
    Despite a solid ending, I’d love to catch up with everyone in a sequel. “What,” I ask, “are they doing today?”
    --Jim Potter, author of Taking Back the Bullet: Trajectories of Self-Discovery

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  2. And, I Cried, Too, by Mike Hartnett is an exceptionally well-written book. Unfortunately, it's not fiction.
    --Jim Potter, author of Taking Back the Bullet: Trajectories of Self-Discovery

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  3. I'm trying my best to be patient, waiting for Julie Stielstra's book, Opulence, Kansas, to be published.

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  4. In Opulence, Kansas, Katie Myrdal’s 15 years old with her life in different worlds. She’s living on the 19th floor of a downtown Chicago apartment building with distant parents, then visits a caring aunt and uncle on the Kansas prairie. Life’s confusing. Katie’s lonely in the city, then surprised about her feelings for a boy with his own nightmares. Overwhelmed with life, Katie learns to cope a day at a time. Author Stielstra creates a vivid picture of Kansas with colorful characters so real you want to invite them home and cook them omelettes.—Jim Potter—author of Taking Back the Bullet: Trajectories of Self-Discovery

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